Jack Weatherford’s new book, Genghis Khan and the Quest for God, argues that the Great Khan pioneered freedom of religion, influenced the US First Amendment

Jack Weatherford’s new book, Genghis Khan and the Quest for God, argues that the Great Khan pioneered freedom of religion, influenced the US First Amendment

Jack Weatherford, New York Times bestselling author of Genghis Khan and the Making of the Modern World, Indian Givers: How the Indians of the Americas Transformed the World, and The Secret History of the Mongol Queens, has delivered another thought-provoking and lively biography that discusses how Genghis harnessed the power of religion to rule the largest empire the world has ever known:  Genghis Khan and the Quest for God. The book is available through Amazon.com and Amazon.ca and in bookstores throughout the US and Canada.  

In interviews, Weatherford says Genghis Khan wasn’t the first leader to believe individuals should have religious freedom but he was the first to make it an international law. “He really believed all religions were true and correct in certain ways,” Weatherford said. A specialist in tribal peoples, Dr. Weatherford was for 29 years a professor of anthropology at Macalaster College in Minnesota (USA) and currently divides his time between the United States and Mongolia. Dr. Weatherford was awarded the Order of the Polar Star, Mongolia’s highest decoration and in 2006 was invited to address the United Nations on the 800th anniversary of the Mongol State. 

A recent review in THE NEW YORKER said the book “presents a figure who not only believed in freedom of religion but pioneered its implementation. Faced with unifying an empire that encompassed numerous warring religions, the Mongols crafted policies that, Weatherford argues, influenced the architects of the U.S. Constitution. (Jefferson and Franklin admired a French biography of the leader.)”

2017-05-20T09:39:16+00:00 November 30th, 2016|Categories: Archives|